Factory Tour Saturday, June 15!

Ever wonder how coffee gets made into something delicious you can drink?

Join us on Saturday, June 15, for a wonderful day of tasting, touring, and talking coffee at our 100-year-old coffee company’s headquarters!

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We’ll lead you on a romp through local history and the story of our 100 years in the New York City coffee industry. You’ll see coffee roasting firsthand, partcipate in a coffee tasting (cupping), and of course take a full tour of our roasting plant.

Tours are $10 and include a free bag of coffee at the end! Our next tour is Saturday, June 15, beginning at 1:00 and wrapping up at about 4:00. Space on the tour is limited due to all the coffee in here, so reserve your space in advance by emailing orders@dallisbroscoffee.com.

Due to the tasting component we ask that all participants show up perfume and cologne free.

If you have any questions, feel free to call our office during business hours, (718) 845-3010.

Cup of Excellence Diaries: Costa Rica 2013, Part II

Matt Swenson, our Director of Coffee, recently headed down to Costa Rica for their annual Cup of Excellence competition. Here is his second postcard home.

Costa Rica Cup of Excellence Cupping

Cupping at the Costa Rica 2013 Cup of Excellence. Photo by Matt Swenson.

As the second day of the week began, so did the official cuppings. This year, there were about 130 national submissions. Of those ~130, only about 35 passed the national jury rounds. The way the Cup of Excellence competition works is that there are two general rounds. First the National Jury, which is made up of Costa Rican citizens, cups and vets the coffees. If the coffees are graded an 85+, they submit it to the International round of competition, or the International Jury. This competition’s particular jury is made up of people from South Korea, Japan, Germany, Norway, England, and the United States, among a few others.

The National Jury selected about 31 coffees for us to cup. The first day was a nice easy day of two tables of 8 coffees each. We began evaluating the coffees based on fragrance, aroma, cleanliness of the cup, sweetness, acidity, mouthfeel, flavor, aftertaste, balance, and our overall impressions. Each of these categories are given a score from 1-8, and then added to a baseline score of +36 to provide a 100 point basis for each of the coffees.

Although the first day of actually grading the coffees was relatively easy, I was very tough on the coffees. I didn’t score anything above 90 points. A lot of this is my grading and cupping style, but I think a lot of it was also getting calibrated with Costa Rican Coffees. In the US, an interesting coffee to us usually revolves around the acidity and flavor first and sweetness or body second. Costa Rican coffees, for me at least, revolved more around sweetness first and the acidity was secondary (of sorts). The sweetness and the body of many of these coffees were elegant, rich, and creamy with chocolate, caramel, and molasses notes. They were all remarkable coffees. Okay…maybe one or two I didn’t care for, but mostly they were all remarkable coffees.

Our day’s field trip was sponsored by Nature’s Best coffee, in which they bussed us out to Finca Señora, where Alberto and Diego Guardia graciously opened their home and farm to us. As we walked down the long dirt path through the farm to their mill, we experienced firsthand the devastating effects of the roya, or leaf rust, hitting the region. Since this farm is at around 1200 meters above sea level, the roya can still grow effectively. Many of the trees have lost leaves and they looked very sickly. On the other side of the road, there were many healthy trees, that were not affected as much due to the varietal. Diego explained that although it did affect them as a farm, the net production effect was not devastating. They increased their production by 30 percent this year, but then lost about 30 percent of their crop to rust. At the end of the day, the production evened itself out to last year’s volume.

As the tour progressed, we arrived at the residence on Finca Señora which was breathtaking. There was an bright green lawn the size of a proper soccer field surrounded by tall palm trees, over looking the valley below. Towards the house, there was a sparkling swimming pool overlooking a colorful garden on the side of the hill, all of which was tied together with a well-seasoned party gazebo. The gazebo set-up was complete with an espresso machine, beer fridge, stereo system, and bathroom down below. The family were great hosts, preparing us a proper feast with several meats and side dishes. A very approachable side of Costa Rican cusine. Oh, and beer, lots of beer. We met other producers, other roasters, as well as mingled with other judges. The experience was great. One of the highlights for me was our impromtu Tuesday Night Throwdown. Manuel, the competition-level barista hired for the occasion, and Ed Kauffman of Joe (NYC) threw down with a latte art contest. Ed won hands down, however there were plenty of hugs and laughs that followed. A few of us opted out of the ride back to the bus and wound the evening down with a nice little night hike through the farm and eventually to the bus. It was nice to feel the brisk temperature at night and make that connection with the farm as those cooler temperatures are most notably attributed to creating great acidity within coffee.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of Matt’s trip to Costa Rica, coming soon.

Cup of Excellence Diaries: Costa Rica 2013, Part I

Matt Swenson, our Director of Coffee, recently headed down to Costa Rica for their annual Cup of Excellence competition. Here is his first postcard home.

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After years of tasting brilliant coffees from past competitions, hearing adventurous tales from afar and seeing pictures of humbled farmers after taking the prized achievement, I boarded an insanely early flight in hopes that my first Cup of Excellence trip would be an unforgettable learning experience.

After checking into the hotel and meeting up with Ed Kaufmann, a fellow New Yorker, more judges from the US, England, Australia, Italy, Germany, Norway, South Korea, and Japan began to arrive. This is when the great sense of reality began to set in. Not only were we in Costa Rica, we were going to be judging and tasting the most prestigious coffee competition in the country, surrounded by some of the most talented people in the industry. With all of the talent, there is an amazing sense of humbleness among all of the judges, organizers and everyone else putting the event on. This is what makes COE special.

The day started off with a nice Costa Rican breakfast. We listened to a few key speeches by the guys at Exclusive Coffees and Nature’s Best, who have been a great sponsors, as well as Susie Spindler, the Executive Director of Alliance for Coffee Excellence.

After a brief introductory slideshow, we were off doing an acid calibration. Nine cups were on the table with varying amounts of acidity, sweetness, mouthfeel, astringency…and one in which I am convinced had slime in it.

A few rounds of coffee calibrations later, we broke for lunch and then headed to our day’s field trip. First stop: Micro Plantas. Micro Plantas is a company that specializes in plant tissue cultivation. What this means is that they can take a leaf from any coffee plant in the world, and through many cellular level maneuvers, they can genetically clone the plant. Brilliant. Let’s take the world’s best Geisha variety, clone it and plant it everywhere. In three to five years, the entire world is going to have La Esmeralda Geisha fantasy-level coffee, right? Although this seems delicious in theory, my past experiences researching in a plant pathology lab make me very skeptical of the long term viability. All skepticism aside, much of this research seems cutting edge and well financed, so I’m excited to continue to follow this project over the next few years.

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After a quick tour of Exclusive Coffee, a major exporter of great micro-lots throughout Costa Rica, we went to a dinner party hosted by Exclusive. We first saw a great presentation by Wayner Jimenez of Exclusive regarding plant varietals and how their cup score correlates to varying altitudes. It was really incredible information for any coffee buyer or producer.

The first day for me was an incredible sensory overload with amazing people that could only be the start of a truly memorable experience.

Matt’s Costa Rica Cup of Excellence Diary will be continued!

May Factory Tour This Weekend!

April Showers bring May Coffee Factory Tours!

Won’t you join us on Saturday, May 4, for a wonderful day of tasting, touring, and talking coffee?

Dallid Bros Coffee - Lever Machine

We’ll lead you on a romp through local history, the history of our 100-year-old New York City coffee company, coffee roasting, coffee tasting (cupping), and a tour of our roasting plant.

Tours are $10 and include a free bag of coffee at the end! Our next tour is Saturday, May 4, beginning at 1:00 and wrapping up at about 4:00. Space on the tour is limited due to all the coffee in here, so reserve your space in advance by emailing orders@dallisbroscoffee.com.

Due to the tasting component we ask that all participants show up perfume and cologne free.

If you have any questions, feel free to call our office during business hours, (718) 845-3010.

Honduras/El Salvador Diaries, Part VI: Success

Our outgoing coffee director, Byron Jackson Holcomb, traveled to Honduras and El Salvador earlier this spring to meet with some of the farms we work with. This is the sixth and final in a series of his travel diaries for us.

Alejandro Valiente teaching about coffee saplings. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Alejandro Valiente teaching about coffee saplings. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Three professional clowns. A couple of notes on Luis and Alejandro. They are total goofballs. They call each other viejo (old man) and gordo (fatty) constantly and they spend a fair percentage of the time laughing. After 3 full days of riding around on bumpy roads through two growing regions (Metapan and Apaneca), we were pretty shot by the end of the last travel day. We had been visiting farms, getting samples, prepping samples and working pretty much non-stop. We left Luis roasting the last samples so we could meet with Oscar and discuss Encantada and Miraflores over dinner at 7pm. The next was cupping and racing to the airport.

After all the belly laughs and travel I crossed all my fingers and toes that the cupping table we were going to taste at the end of the trip was going to be great. Luis has been a Cup of Excellence (CoE) Judge in several countries and he and I tend to be pretty calibrated. We did one big table of curated samples from our trip, twelve coffees in all. Coffee might all look the same when it is brewed, but none of it ever tastes the same. Luis and Alejandro set one of the best cupping tables I’ve possibly ever had. It was like the finals day in a CoE competition. I honestly gave two 90s and several others landed in the 87 range.

We shared notes. Our notes were about the same. On the way to the airport we could still taste the delicious coffees with all the glorious fruit notes still singing on our palates.

Usually when I go to a coffee producing country, I tell my hosts exactly what I’m after on that visit. My intent is to set them up for success. Some hosts follow what I ask to the letter and absolutely knock it out of the park, others don’t read emails as closely and we end up doing what they do with everyone: generic cupping and generic farm visits. This trip with these guys was the first type. Success.

Finding people like Luis and Alejandro takes time energy and several stamps in your passport. Ultimately I feel like after this trip we (at Dallis) not only have fantastic partners, we have two more friends that work like we do, with relentless passion—and lots of belly laughs.

Honduras/El Salvador Diaries, Part V: Land of Enchantment

Our coffee director, Byron Jackson Holcomb, traveled to Honduras and El Salvador earlier this month to meet with some of the farms we work with. This is the fifth in a series of his travel diaries.

Coffee at La Encantada, El Salvador. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Coffee at La Encantada, El Salvador. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

La Encantada is a story that is too good to be true. Ten years ago the Figueroa family with the help of some investors in the United States purchased a plot of land that is about 600 acres in size; it is 99.9% a nature reserve. The family has a perfect mix of siblings: an environmentalist, an industrialist and a farmer. The three siblings all have their own set of priorities, so in the end they all balance out and the story only gets better and better. The environmentalist has her priorities set 100% in conservation of the cloud forest. The industrialist is incredibly proud of the cup score and quality and is excited to produce more and more of this fantastic coffee. The farmer couldn’t be happier to have a high altitude coffee farm in the family.

La Encantada is just that, an enchanter. A short hike above the farm quickly becomes a cloud forest. The trees are covered in orchids and bromeliads. There are primary old growth trees and secondary and tertiary growth trees. As I walk through a narrow path the forest becomes dark. Barely any light can make it through the multi-layer canopy to the ferns below. At one point I joked that a T-rex was going to jump out and eat Luis because it looked like a scene from Jurassic Park. I spent the trip with the industrialist, Oscar. He passionately described his family’s mission to reestablish a cloud forest on the top of this mountain because that ensures water for the entire watershed and the towns below, like Metapan where he is from. Oscar clearly has done his research: he eloquently described how the cloud forest has moved up the mountain and now at the very top there are species that really shouldn’t be there. The middle elevation species and biodiversity has migrated up the mountain with deforestation. La Encantada is at the very top of the mountain. The cloud forest has nowhere to go but into thin air.

The coffee farm was started about seven years ago as a way to generate some employment opportunities for the community and provide income to the reserve so that it can be self-sufficient. They have a payroll of six full-time employees. In the family there are two farms: Miraflores and Encantada. This is where Alejandro played a crucial role in discovering La Encantada. Every year the family would harvest Encantada and blend it with the 20 acre farm, Miraflores, and sell it internally. Last year, Alejandro asked him to keep Encantada separate until he and Luis could cup it. Boom. The coffee sprang off the cupping table and we danced a little jig, knowing that we could buy that coffee last year. This year again we did a little dance.

encantada-drying

Here is where I was totally surprised. I walked on to the tiny two-acre plot of land to find white sandy soil (like I’ve seen in Brazil) and coffee trees that weren’t in perfect health. Alejandro, a farmer himself, showed me that when areas were heavily farmed with corn the coffee shows signs of a lack in sulfur. It looks like a thin yellow rim around the leaves. Other leaves showed signs of a lack of boron, others zinc, there was some leaf rust present on the leaves. This coffee was struggling to survive and yet the cups on the cupping table were bursting with life.

Like most farms there was a majority of one coffee variety but then there were some others too. The farm is mostly Pacamara. The rest looks like a combination of Pacas, Bourbon, and some old tree that none of us could identify (between three well-traveled farmers). For me it looked like a short berry variety from Ethiopia, the cherries were comically small, it was tall and spindly like a Typica, but upon closer inspection it just looked more like something I’ve seen in Kochere Ethiopia that I was told was “green tip”. The farm manager, who’s nickname is Tucan, said the trees were at least 50 years old. We could call it a Mokka, and nobody could say we were wrong. Considering that it so different in form shape, bean and Brix % of 29, I proposed that we call it Tucan.

encantada-brix

We had them pick the Pacamara separate from the other varieties. The other varieties all together would earn a perfect score for sweetness on the the Cup of Excellence form from me (92 cup). Coffees this tasty don’t happen on every cupping table. Coffees like these don’t happen every year. The Pacamara was a fantastic Pacamara (86+). It still holds on to some of that Pacamara flavor and but has layers of fruit and chocolate in between that make it a joy to cup.

After getting the premium for the quality last year (which was 5 times more than they got the year before for the same coffee), the family is looking at options to produce more coffee. The environmentalist gave the industrialist permission to clear a few more acres, but on one condition, it must be done organically. This means the farmer needs to learn some more skills about organic production, the industrialist needs to wait at least one to two years longer for decent harvest and the environmentalist has more a more financially sustainable reserve.

When I heard this story from Luis the first time, I said it sounds too good to be true. I’ll wait until I get there before I get really excited. Well I can tell you that this is all true because I saw it for myself.

Stay tuned for Part Six of Byron’s Honduras & El Salvador trip, coming soon.

April Factory Tour this Saturday

Won’t you join us on Saturday, April 6, for a wonderful day of tasting, touring, and talking coffee?

We’ll lead you on a romp through local history, the history of our 100-year-old New York City coffee company, coffee roasting, coffee tasting (cupping), and a tour of our roasting plant.

Tours are $10 and include a free bag of coffee at the end! Our next tour is Saturday, April 6, beginning at 1:00 and wrapping up at about 4:00. Space on the tour is limited due to all the coffee in here, so reserve your space in advance by emailing orders@dallisbroscoffee.com.

Due to the tasting component we ask that all participants show up perfume and cologne free.

If you have any questions, feel free to call our office during business hours, (718) 845-3010.

Honduras/El Salvador Diaries, Part IV: Unlikely Terrain

Our coffee director, Byron Jackson Holcomb, traveled to Honduras and El Salvador earlier this month to meet with some of the farms we work with. This is the fourth in a series of his travel diaries.

El Salvador. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

El Salvador. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

I crossed the border on foot from Honduras to El Salvador. Luis Rodriguez and Alejandro Valiente picked me up in a pickup truck and we took off to Alejando’s farm. We had about a half-mile of paved road and then it turned to a rocky bumpy ride for the next few hours. After about 10 unmarked turns on dusty roads we ended up on the top of a mountain looking out over a section of Pacamara.

As we climbed slowly up the dusty, dry road, Alejandro told me the story of this place. His great grandfather was one of the founders of the area, and basically made the town. In my travels of the world, I almost always find coffee areas with green vegetation that see enough rain to keep the soil a dark shade of red or brown. This area was different. There were lots of pine trees and oaks—both signs of poor nutrient soils. The area looked like a drier version of the Honduras I had just left. The only signs of agriculture were cattle and the occasional plot of corn or veggie garden. I was totally perplexed. Why do I often pick his region off the cupping table as my favorite? If you follow these trip reports, I’ve said at least a dozen times: healthy trees produce quality fruit and delicious coffee. This place looks like a high, steep, dry, temperate forest. The soil is white and there are lots of visible rocks everywhere. How on earth does this place produce such lush, fantastic coffees?

Alejandro told me about the days of the past in this region called Metapan, where the soil is a white clay base. “They were all farmers, so they had cattle, corn, sugar cane, coffee and lime mines. When they went to plant coffee, it wasn’t like they just planted a whole mountainside. My great grandparents had to find the best spots that had the correct slope, aspect, moisture, soil and shade for coffee. The conditions were (and are) so harsh that they had to find these small micro climates that could support coffee.”

Dry season in Metapan. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Dry season in Metapan. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Sure it makes sense that this region has only a few places that could support great coffee, just look at it. But the fact that the coffee here is so spectacular (especially the Pacamaras)…didn’t make sense to me. To give it some credit, I was visiting Metapan during the driest season and just after the harvest. The soil was thirsty for rain. The horizon was brumoso—foggy (this happens a lot during the dry seasons because all the dust clouds the views, one good rain and the view becomes crystal clear). From way up El Pinal—Metapan, we should have been able to see three counties: El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. We could only see the border of Guatemala marked by a big lake. If it weren’t for a mountain to the south, we could maybe have seen Nicaragua as well.

Some of the better-looking farms still looked rough. The wind last week had been really strong and cold. The soil on many of the farms was bare and exposed to the sun. The Pacamara trees looked like they had lived a hard life. They were nothing like the lush perfectly formed large droopy-leafed trees I expected. If you look at the coffee region map that shows growing regions, there is almost no coffee grown in this region. The regions look like little blotches of spilled green paint on the border with Honduras.

Now take the two departments (El Salvador has departments like the U.S. has States) in this region: Chaletenango and Metapan. Chaletenango has a red clay soil. Metapan has a white clay soil. On the whole there were lots of pine trees and lots of dust. The rocky roads made forward progress slow and never in a straight line. We spent the better part of three days on these roads twisting and winding our way between two major mountains at the northernmost corner of El Salvador.

Luis, Alejandro and I visited three farms: Finca Buenos Aires (not the one we usually buy from), Finca La Encantada and Finca Miraflores. None of the farms were close together. In a helicopter it would have been an easy trip. But we work in coffee and helicopters are mainly for people who work on Wall Street. The fog followed us around. There were some fantastic views—but they only let us see where we were the day before.

Stay tuned for Part five of Byron’s Honduras & El Salvador trip, coming soon.

Honduras Diaries, Part III: The Millionaires

Our coffee director, Byron Jackson Holcomb, traveled to Honduras and El Salvador last month to meet with some of the farms we work with. This is the third in a series of his travel diaries.

Capucas, Honduras. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Capucas, Honduras. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

One of my business mentors along the way said, “if you get enough people what they want, you will eventually get what you want.” In coffee it couldn’t be more true. After my day with Renan I spent one cold wet day in Capucas and then one day in La Labor. The climates couldn’t have been more different.

Capucas is between 1300 and 1600 meters and spends a lot of time in the clouds. The farmers there have a fantastic co-op and many are quadruple certified: Rainforest Alliance, Organic, Utz and Fair Trade. The Fair Trade premiums have provided the income to build a new wet mill and improve their dry mill.

The soil and terrain in Capucas is perfect for coffee. Lots of rain, abundant shade, great varieties, and the farmers own enough land to make a living. It reminded me of a cloud forest in Costa Rica—misty and cold. I told one of our partners there that they are millionaires. They can wake up to healthy air and pure water on their farms every day, coffee is profitable and they even make enough to own a nice pickup truck. The community leaders are charismatic salesmen who produce organic coffee using all kinds of advanced techniques.

Washing channel in Capucas. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Washing channel in Capucas. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Organic coffee production requires a lot of creative inputs. They can’t go to the agro supply store and buy a product for a specific issue, like roya for example. They have to work with their environment to find ways to make the plants healthier. One new technique that I’ve heard about a few times is called M.M. They are mountain micro-organisms. The idea is to create a healthy natural blend of bacteria and fungus for foliar sprays and fertilizers. In theory it is simple. Go in to the natural forest, find white fungus and bacteria that are in decomposing leaves and put them in an anaerobic tank for 15 days with sugar and wheat flour. This will make them multiply. Add that solution to an organic fertilizer (like processed coffee fruit) and spray it on the plants. I was talking with a certification expert there and they make 16 different organic products using M.M.s as the base. The coffees here are delicious. Looking at micro-lots they have all the top farmers separated and there is one micro-region in particular that I really like: it is sweet, acidic, complex with notes of red and blue berries and has a thick base of chocolate that supports the symphony of flavors. Let’s just say I really like that particular micro-region with in Capucas.

Jump in a 4-wheel drive pickup for a couple hours and drive west to La Labor and the environment is another story. The elevation is a bit lower and the climate totally different. The grasses look dry, the dominant naturally growing tree is pine, and there isn’t as much rainfall. Here in a different co-op they are making 4 different products from the coffee pulp: ethanol, worm compost, bio-gas, and a foliar (leaf) spray for the coffee trees. At this particular co-op, about half the farmers are Organic Certified and the coffees didn’t have the same, bright sweet citric notes that some Capucas coffees had. The coffees were a bit more base-y and had more chocolate tones. The Roya has been hard on this region as well. But the plants that have been treated with the spray have been recovering remarkably from the Roya. I asked one of the managers from the co-op, Roberto Salazar, if coffee could be produced organically on any farm worldwide? After a long pause, he said, “If you start with soil that is weak, it would be very difficult to produce coffee organically.” His farm has a fantastic production level and is sustainable in every way.

Stay tuned for Part IV of Byron’s Honduras & El Salvador trip, coming soon.

Honduras Diaries, Part II: Rust and Sweetness

Our coffee director, Byron Jackson Holcomb, traveled to Honduras and El Salvador earlier this month to meet with some of the farms we work with. This is the second in a series of his travel diaries.

Byron on Finca Las Cascadas. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Byron on Finca Las Cascadas. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

At Dallis we don’t use the term Direct Trade. For us to invest in a term or mark it must first be defined. The specialty industry can’t define the mark. We do plenty of business “directly” with farmers—but that is just how we work.

Finca Las Cascadas produced some really great coffee last year. It was tasty, came from a well-respected farm, we paid a premium for the cup quality, and the farmer, Renan, was motivated to do coffee experiments and explore the quality that he can produce. For me, that is a home run.

When I get to Renan’s house, he asks me, “tienes mas burros?”—do you have more donkeys? Then he points at my feet and marches in place. Nope, I only have these two donkeys. I’ll lend you mine for the farm. He returns from his bedroom with a pair of his boots for me to wear. It has been drizzling rain for two days and the area is a cold wet mess.

I put on his boots and we took off in a 4×4 truck to get to his farm. We drove past farms that have no leaves left on the trees and we drove past farms that looked fantastic. I was eager to see what his farm looked like. In short, the Catimore trees looked great and the Red and Yellow Catuai looked pretty thin. We talked a lot about how to deal with roya. (See an earlier entry about roya here.) Then we went to see the 3-year-old planted section of his farm. Last year when he showed me this section it was beautiful. Lots of small trees planted at the correct distance, only Red and Yellow Catuai.

This year we walked to that section and he said, “this was my hope, but now look at it”. He went on to say, “Some of the trees have their full harvest on them still. I sent you some pictures of this section and the trees were beautiful, full of healthy leaves and green coffee.” But that harvest on the trees is still green. Roya has made the tree sick and the leaves have fallen off, this way the tree has no way of maturing the fruit. So there are branches that are totally green and just a few ripe cherries. Renan said, “Next week I’m going to strip off the coffee and then spray for roya and fertilize.

“But listen: I’m not the person who is going to convert my whole farm to Catimore and and lose hope. We are going to win this battle with roya”. When he said that his eyes sparkled and inspired in me a lot of faith in quality coffee.

Another leader of a respected co-op told me that he estimates Honduras to have about 20% of Catimore planted now, and after this roya outbreak, they might have close to 80-90% planted. It is really a scary number. On the cupping table earlier this week, we had one farm on the table twice. One lot was an 85.5 (Catuai) really sweet, great acidity, nice complexity. The second lot was about an 82-83 (Catuai and Catimore), much flatter, not a lot of acidity or sweetness. If you just look at the scores you could say “but it is only 2.5 – 3.5 points.” But on the SCAA scale, the difference between an 83 and an 85.5 is not small. I would consider buying a 85.5 but 83 simply isn’t good enough for Dallis Bros.

The conversion to Catimore is a scary one. Not only that I don’t think it will work in the long run, what I’ve heard from many coffee people is that Catimore is great, until Roya mutates. Look at Colombia. They have three varieites: Catimore, Colombia and Castillo. All of which are Catimores, but don’t seem to be as resistant to roya as they were in the past. So sure, plant Catimore now, in 5 years when those trees are fruiting, what happens and the newest mutation of roya is attacking the Catimore of now?…sounds like a vicious, losing cycle. By the way, it takes more than 5 years to develop a new variety and distribute the seeds.

Testing coffee cherry with a Brix meter at Finca Las Cascadas. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

Testing coffee cherry with a Brix meter at Finca Las Cascadas. Photo by Byron Jackson Holcomb.

From Finca Las Cascadas, we took some ripe cherries for testing with the refractometer. The Red Catuai had a sugar percentage in the fruit of 21%. That is ideal for cup quality, so I’m told. The Yellow Catuai that was fully ripe (yellow with hints of brown) had a sugar percentage of 21.5%. Yellow Catuai with a hint of green read 19%. Then we tested the most perfect cherry of Catimore, it read…14.5%. The coffee fruit tasted gelatinous without sweetness. Renan was floored by the refractometer. “This is fantastic to show other farmers.” I told him that I haven’t personally cupped each level of ripeness and variety in Honduras, but I have a really great source who has in other countries and according to him, the sugar percentage and the cup follow directly: high sugar percentage, high cup score, low sugar percentage.

Renan is doing everything correctly, in my book. He spends a lot of time on his farm. He is a community leader. He is intentionally drying his coffee on top of his warehouse, “because it is removed from the dust and dirt”. I say sometimes that everything ends up in the cup. And when I see really clean drying patios they are almost always better cupping farms.

Renan had a couple experiments for me to cup. One was about a tiny bit of a full natural and other was Dallis Process, as we call it (hybrid natural and washed process). The natural was intense like a Harrar, clean and well-processed. The Dallis Process was solid. According to the QC person at Beneficio Santa Rosa, it was the best of his coffees this year. I don’t make buying decisions outside of our lab in Ozone Park, so I need to cup it there. I really hope that Renan’s coffee wins the table, but according to the first cupping, the Dallis Process was an 84.

In the New York market we can’t just sell a story. The cup has to be there. Per how we buy coffee it is simple, we buy coffees that win the table. If Renan’s coffee doesn’t win the table, I have to be really honest and share his cup score and feedback. Next year, I’ll make sure his coffee is on the table so that we have a chance to do business.

Sometimes these relationships transcend the buyer-seller back-and-forth. With Renan, I feel like I have a new friend. One that calls me for advice as to where he can buy Gesha seeds and my opinion as a buyer on Pacamara. When he calls, I clear my desk and give him all my attention. We talk like two farmers, sharing information and experiences. While, I can’t buy coffee from someone because they are a friend, I do share all the information I know so that we can all keep specialty coffee growing and improving.